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The future for autonomous cars is bright says Nissan

The world we live in will be revolutionised by autonomous cars with growing numbers of them utilising self-driving technology, says carmaker Nissan.

However, the future won't be here any time soon and we are still years from this car revolution - it may be at least 10 years before a fully autonomous vehicle is available.

Despite this, Nissan says it is committed to bringing self-driving cars to the market and is planning to invest huge amounts by 2050 doing so.

Commitment to create autonomous cars

The world we live in will be revolutionised by autonomous cars with growing numbers of them utilising self-driving technology, says carmaker Nissan.

However, the future won't be here any time soon and we are still years from this car revolution - it may be at least 10 years before a fully autonomous vehicle is available.

Despite this, Nissan says it is committed to bringing self-driving cars to the market and is planning to invest huge amounts by 2050 doing so.

Commitment to create autonomous cars

nissan-qashqai-autonomous-cars-car-trust-3
Nissan says the future for autonomous cars is bright.

To help underpin its commitment to create autonomous cars, Nissan has also unveiled that the 2017 Qashqai will feature autonomous elements though it appears that most of the autonomy is similar to adaptive cruise control that will help brake the Qashqai to avoid hitting other vehicles and to avoid obstacles.

The system is called Piloted Drive and ProPilot is some countries but the firm is reluctant to say whether it will feature as a standard item on the new model or whether it will be a costly option. It is already, however, available on cars in Japan.

The firm says it is still working on the system and by 2018 it will have the ability to change lanes and to overtake slower vehicles and within three years the system will be able to navigate around city centres successfully.

All autonomous vehicles will need to consider

One issue that Nissan has identified that all autonomous vehicles will need to consider is the social conventions we all take part in when driving and these will differ around the world and even within the regions of a country.

To that end, Nissan has employed social scientists including psychologists, sociologists and anthropologists as well as software experts to ensure the cars can navigate successfully along the streets.

Nissan has now published a report which aims to detail the economic and social opportunities that autonomous cars will bring and the firm points out the social challenges as well as the technology obstacles that will need to be overcome.

Autonomous cars in the UK

nissan-qashqai-autonomous-cars-car-trust-2The report, which is focused on autonomous cars in the UK, Spain and Germany, points out that around 0.15% will be added to Europe's annual economic growth rate every year for decades to come.

Nissan says that by 2050, Europe's gross domestic product will be 5.3% higher than it is today which means autonomous cars will have generated around €17 trillion to the continent's GDP.

That's a lofty prediction from Nissan but there's no doubt that autonomous cars will begin appearing on our roads and it's likely that they will be a popular choice for electric vehicles and Nissan is also looking to launch their own car sharing schemes as well.

So, while Nissan says the future for autonomous cars is bright it does look like the science fiction writers of yesteryear may have been onto something with the notion that our cars in the future will drive themselves and deliver higher safety levels too.

To help underpin its commitment to create autonomous cars, Nissan has also unveiled that the 2017 Qashqai will feature autonomous elements though it appears that most of the autonomy is similar to adaptive cruise control that will help brake the Qashqai to avoid hitting other vehicles and to avoid obstacles.

The system is called Piloted Drive and ProPilot is some countries but the firm is reluctant to say whether it will feature as a standard item on the new model or whether it will be a costly option. It is already, however, available on cars in Japan.

The firm says it is still working on the system and by 2018 it will have the ability to change lanes and to overtake slower vehicles and within three years the system will be able to navigate around city centres successfully.

All autonomous vehicles will need to consider

One issue that Nissan has identified that all autonomous vehicles will need to consider is the social conventions we all take part in when driving and these will differ around the world and even within the regions of a country.

To that end, Nissan has employed social scientists including psychologists, sociologists and anthropologists as well as software experts to ensure the cars can navigate successfully along the streets.

Nissan has now published a report which aims to detail the economic and social opportunities that autonomous cars will bring and the firm points out the social challenges as well as the technology obstacles that will need to be overcome.

Autonomous cars in the UK

nissan-qashqai-autonomous-cars-car-trust-2The report, which is focused on autonomous cars in the UK, Spain and Germany, points out that around 0.15% will be added to Europe's annual economic growth rate every year for decades to come.

Nissan says that by 2050, Europe's gross domestic product will be 5.3% higher than it is today which means autonomous cars will have generated around €17 trillion to the continent's GDP.

That's a lofty prediction from Nissan but there's no doubt that autonomous cars will begin appearing on our roads and it's likely that they will be a popular choice for electric vehicles and Nissan is also looking to launch their own car sharing schemes as well.

So, while Nissan says the future for autonomous cars is bright it does look like the science fiction writers of yesteryear may have been onto something with the notion that our cars in the future will drive themselves and deliver higher safety levels too.